National Safety Council Estimates Nearly 400 Fatalities in Car Crashes during Labor
Thursday, 28 August 2014 14:41

"The National Safety Council (NSC) estimates 395 people will be killed and an additional 42,300 will be injured in car crashes during the Labor Day holiday weekend, according to a news release. The period for consideration begins at 6 p.m. on Friday, Aug. 29, and ends at 11:59 p.m. on Monday, Sept. 1. They also estimate that 144 lives could be saved over the period by buckling up.

“Labor Day weekend marks the end of summer activities – it should be a time of celebration,” said Deborah A.P. Hersman, president and CEO of NSC, in the statement. “Unfortunately, this weekend will be a time of tragedy for hundreds of families that experience a preventable fatality on our NSC has given the following recommendations to make for a safer Labor Day weekend: refrain from using cellphones – handheld or hands-free – because there is no safe way to use a cell phone while driving; do not manipulate in-vehicle infotainment systems or electronic devices, including GPS systems, while the vehicle is in motion; make sure all passengers are buckled up and children are in safety seats appropriate for their age and size; allow plenty of travel time to avoid frustration and diminish the impulse to speed; drive defensively and exercise caution, especially during inclement weather; designate a non-drinking driver or plan for alternative transportation, such as a taxi."

 

For more details, click here!

 
CSB Warns About Danger of Hot Work on Tanks Containing Biological or Organic Material
Thursday, 28 August 2014 14:39

 

"CSB Chairperson Moure-Eraso has released a statement regarding the dangers of working in hot conditions on tanks containing biological or organic matter. His statement lists three serious hot work incidents that all involved fatalities:

  • On July 28, 2014, a tank explosion at the Omega Protein facility in Moss Point, Mississippi, killed one contract worker and severely injured another. The tank contained eight inches of stickwater, and the explosion blew the lid off of the tank.
  • Three workers were killed on July 29, 2008 at the Packaging Corporation of America (PCA) while performing hot work on a catwalk above an 80-foot-tall tank of “white water,” which is a slurry of pulp fiber waste and water. Hydrogen-producing bacteria were later discovered in the tank, and when this hydrogen gas ignited, it ripped open the tank lid, sending the workers to their death.
  • On February 16, 2009, a welding contractor was killed while repairing a water clarifier tank at the ConAgra Foods facility in Boardman, Oregon when a tank producing flammable gas exploded.Moure-Eraso says that these tragedies underscore the “extreme importance of careful hot work planning, hazard evaluation and procedures for all storage tanks, whether or not flammable material is expected to be present.”

To continue reading, click here!

 
Laser Safety: The Eyes Have It!
Thursday, 28 August 2014 14:36

"Pierre Gougelman had the first glass eye factory in the United States in 1851. At first, the public thought artificial eyes actually gave their wearers new sight.If only glass eyes worked that way! Unfortunately, some lasers can result in permanent retinal damage and blindness. Lasers have many common applications these days, everything from barcode scanners and laser pointers to military laser targeting and weapons, and a wide range of medical and industrial applications. It's this last group that I’m most familiar with, having worked for several companies as the Laser Safety Officer.

Laser Light

Laser light differs from ordinary light in three ways:

  • Monochromatic--Laser light consists of one color or wavelength. In contrast, ordinary white light is a combination of many colors or wavelengths.
  • Directional--Lasers emit light that is highly directional, that is, laser light is emitted as a relatively narrow beam in a specific direction. Ordinary light, such as from a light bulb, is emitted in many directions away from the source.
  • Coherent--The wavelengths of the laser light are in phase in space and time. Ordinary light can be a mixture of many wavelengths.

It is these differences that make the laser beams useful and potentially hazardous."

 

Click here to read more!

 
OSHA issue new directive to keep communication tower workers safe: new citations issued to protect workers
Wednesday, 27 August 2014 16:15

"OSHA has updated its Communication Tower directive regarding the use of hoist systems used to move workers to and from workstations on communication towers. This follows an alarming increase in preventable injuries and fatalities at communication tower work sites. More fatalities occurred in this industry in 2013 than in the previous two years combined. This disturbing trend appears to be continuing, with nine worker deaths occurring so far in 2014.The directive outlines the proper use of hoist and other fall arrest systems, includes detailed information on how to hoist people safely and updates a 2002 enforcement policy, which only covered the hoisting of workers to workstations during new tower erection activities. The updated policy covers any work on a communication tower - including both maintenance and new construction - that involves the use of a hoist to lift workers from one elevated workstation to another."

For more information, click here!

 
Home Improvement Company Fined for Exposing Workers to Potentially Fatal Fall Hazards
Wednesday, 27 August 2014 16:05

"OSHA announced it has cited Kevin Burke Home Improvement for repeatedly exposing its employees to potentially fatal falls of 20 feet or more at a Lackawanna, N.Y., work site. The home improvement business based in Hamburg, N.Y., was cited for five serious and two willful safety violations, with total proposed penalties of $56,400.

OSHA inspectors saw employees working on a roof and on a scaffold without fall protection. They then instructed the employer to ensure that all workers used fall protection before continuing work. When an OSHA inspector returned the next day, he found the equipment was not being used. Because of this, OSHA cited Kevin Burke Home Improvement for two willful violations of fall protection requirements, with $44,000 in fines.

OSHA also cited the contractor for five serious violations, with $12,400 in fines, for not providing required hard hats to workers to protect them against head injuries from falling debris and for overloading a scaffold and failing to provide proper fall protection equipment.

"Falls are the number one killer in construction work. To raise awareness of fall hazards and safeguards, OSHA has created an ongoing fall prevention campaign aimed at educating workers, employers and the public about how employers must plan work safely, provide their employees with proper effective fall protection equipment, and train their employees to recognize fall hazards before they occur," said Robert Kulick, OSHA's regional administrator for New York."

 

For more information, click here!

 
<< Start < Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Next > End >>

Page 1 of 270
Association Logos