New Hand Safety Website Launched
Friday, 11 July 2014 17:14

"CPWR—The Center for Construction Research and Training has launched a helpful new website that can help contractors and trades workers prevent hand injuries and ailments such as tendinitis and carpal tunnel syndrome.

The site offers specific information tailored for the masonry trades.

It was developed under the guidance of the Masonry Research to Practice Partnership and includes information that anyone can use, such as information on how to select hand tools and gloves and training materials on how to identify hazards and protect your hands."

Click here to view this new website!

 
Be Prepared: Five Potential Welding Safety Hazards to Avoid
Friday, 11 July 2014 17:11

"Safety is a critical consideration for any welding project. Arc welding is a safe occupation when proper precautions are taken, but if safety measures are ignored, welders face an array of hazards that can be potentially dangerous, including electric shock, fumes and gases, fire, explosions, and more.

Welding operators face an array of hazards. To help keep welders safe, organizations such as the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists and OSHA offer safety guidelines to help control, minimize, or to help employers and workers avoid welding hazards.

Employers should ensure that all workers have an opportunity to comply with the following important guidelines in the workplace:

  • Read and understand manufacturer instructions for equipment
  • Carefully review safety data sheets
  • Follow the company's internal safety practices
  • Awareness of the most common welding hazards and knowing how to avoid them ensures a safe, productive work environment for all.

Electric Shock:

Electric shock is one of the most serious and immediate risks facing a welder. Electric shock can lead to severe injury or death, either from the shock itself or from a fall caused by the reaction to a shock.Electric shock occurs when welders touch two metal objects that have a voltage between them, thereby inserting themselves into the electrical circuit.

For instance, if a worker holds a bare wire in one hand and a second bare wire with another, electric current will pass through that wire and through the welding operator, causing an electric shock. The higher the voltage, the higher the current, and thus the higher the risk for the electric shock to result in injury or death."

 

For more details about welding safety, click here!

 
FAA Receives Unleaded Fuels Proposals
Friday, 11 July 2014 16:57

"The FAA announced yesterday it has received ten replacement fuel proposals from producers Afton Chemical Company, Avgas LLC, Shell, Swift Fuels and a consortium of BP, TOTAL and Hjelmco, for further evaluation in the Piston Aviation Fuels Initiative (PAFI), an industry-government initiative designed to help the general aviation industry transition to an unleaded aviation gasoline. The FAA will now assess the viability of the candidate fuels to determine which fuels may be part of the first phase of laboratory testing at the FAA’s William J. Hughes Technical Center. The goal is for government and industry to work together to have a new unleaded fuel by 2018.

“We’re committed to getting harmful lead out of general aviation fuel,” said Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx. “This work will benefit the environment and provide a safe and available fuel for our general aviation community.” There are approximately 167,000 general aviation aircraft in the United States that rely on 100 low lead aviation gasoline for safe operation. It is the only remaining transportation fuel in the United States that contains the addition of lead, a toxic substance, to create the very high octane levels needed for high-performance aircraft. Commercial airplanes have never used leaded gas. PAFI has been established to facilitate the development and deployment of a new unleaded aviation gasoline with the least impact on the existing piston-engine aircraft fleet. PAFI will play a key role in the testing and deployment of an unleaded fuel across the existing general aviation fleet. Congress authorized $6 million for the fiscal year 2014 budget to support the PAFI test program at the FAA Technical Center.

“The FAA, the general aviation community and the Environmental Protection Agency are focused on this issue, and we look forward to collaborating with fuel producers to make an unleaded aviation gasoline available for the general aviation fleet,” said FAA Administrator Michael Huerta. On June 10, 2013, the FAA asked fuel producers to submit proposals for replacement fuels by July 1, 2014. The goal is to identify, select, and provide fleetwide certification for fuels determined to have the lowest impact on the general aviation fleet. The FAA will analyze the candidate fuels in terms of their impact on the existing fleet, the production and distribution infrastructure, their impact on the environment, their toxicology and the cost of aircraft operations. By Sept. 1, 2014, the FAA will select several of the fuels to for phase-one laboratory and rig testing.

Based on the results of the phase one testing, the FAA anticipates that two or three fuels will be selected for phase-two engine and aircraft testing. That testing will generate standardized qualification and certification data for candidate fuels, along with property and performance data."

For more information, click here!

 
Nanotechnology's Place in the EHS Workplace
Thursday, 10 July 2014 14:54

"In one of Safety 2014's technical sessions, two EHS professionals - John Baker, CIH and Amanda Archer, CIH, CSP - discussed updating nanotechnology for the EHS professional for 2014.The two presenters began by discussing what nanotechnology and nanometer scales are and what they mean for employee health. They pointed out naturally occurring nanoparticles - such as salt water - as well as types of modern day technology that exploit the use of nano particles, such as carbon nano fibers, water filtration, sunscreen and solar panels.Next, Archer and Baker pointed out that nanomaterials and nanoparticles are here to stay. Some think they are hazardous, but they are just an emerging technology.

"Nano means more surface area than mass, but it also refers to reactivity chemical, magnetic, electrical and optical.The presentation continued on to explore the toxicity of nanomaterials and their effects on the respiratory tract. In fact, 80% of inhaled nanoparticles can reside in the respiratory system for more than 48 hours. In addition, 20-50% of the particles reach the alveoli."

 

To continue reading, click here!

 
We Are DOT Compliant!
Thursday, 10 July 2014 14:51

 
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